On Reaching out to Those on the Margins

I am so pained by the vilification of all refugees based on the actions of a few. Pope Francis, nearly daily, calls us to respond with compassion to those on the margins – in the world, in our communities and in our lives. Please check out my post on Loyola Press’ dotMagis blog this month:

A Grain of Compassion

 

 

“What is it that I Love?”

Want to delve deeper with this question?  Check out my post on the dotMagis blog this month!

Love, Relationship, and How We Live

“Where’d You Go?”

Dear friends,

Thank you for your feedback and for asking where I’ve gone!

Things got really busy in September of last year and haven’t slowed down yet! So, I’ve only been able to get a blog a month out.  Until I have time to write more here, you can find my monthly blogs on the dotMagis blog of  Loyola Press.

 

My latest blog is out today and can be found here:

http://www.ignatianspirituality.com/23747/de-caussade-chance-encounter-divine-intervention?

 

Older blogs can be found at:

http://www.ignatianspirituality.com/author/ruiz

 

Peace,

Rebecca

“Not a dime to my name”

Gospel Mk 12:38-44

In the course of his teaching Jesus said to the crowds, “Beware of the scribes, who like to go around in long robes and accept greetings in the marketplaces, seats of honor in synagogues, and places of honor at banquets. They devour the houses of widows and, as a pretext recite lengthy prayers. They will receive a very severe condemnation.”

He sat down opposite the treasury and observed how the crowd put money into the treasury. Many rich people put in large sums. A poor widow also came and put in two small coins worth a few cents. Calling his disciples to himself, he said to them, “Amen, I say to you, this poor widow put in more than all the other contributors to the treasury. For they have all contributed from their surplus wealth, but she, from her poverty, has contributed all she had, her whole livelihood.”

At Mass today, we heard this Gospel passage of the “widow’s mite.”  The mite was the smallest of Roman coins.  This widow had just two of these small coins, today worth less than a penny, and she gave them to God.  Jesus says of her contribution, “Amen, I say to you, this poor widow put in more than all the other contributors to the treasury.  For they have all contributed from their surplus wealth, but she, from her poverty, has contributed all she had, her whole livelihood.”

This Gospel passage is not about currency or donations – it’s about trust.  This woman trusted God with everything she had.  To be a widow during that time period, was to be in a very vulnerable position, especially economically. At that time, women were generally financially cared for by men.  Almost always, to become a widow and remain unmarried meant a lifetime sentence of destitution.  She would have had very little opportunity to make her own money, and if she did have some skill or handiwork, she would still be able to earn only very small amounts of money without a man to represent her in business interactions.  It took a lot of courage to donate all of her money.  Her donation belied her deep trust in God. This was a woman who was completely confident that God would provide.

Every time I hear this passage, it reminds me of the first time I completely trusted God myself.  One day, when I was in grad school, I did what she did.  I wasn’t thinking of the “widow’s mite” passage.  It wasn’t even in the corner of my mind.  I just needed a miracle.

I had five dollars.  It was July. I had just paid my very first rental payment on my off-campus housing and I didn’t have a job yet.  I had no financial resources. My car had broken down. I had no money to fix it.

So, I had five dollars to buy food for the whole week.  I knew I could buy a frozen pack of bagels, a dozen eggs, and some cheese with this five dollars.  I knew this because I had been surviving on this budget and this food for over a month.

I needed a job.  I had applied to various positions that would fit my graduate student schedule but hadn’t heard back from any yet.  So, I went to Mass to ask God for help.

As I went to put my money into the collection basket, I looked at my $5 dollars, surrounded by $20’s and hesitated a brief moment.

I thought to myself, “Look at all of those $20’s. What difference will my measly $5 make anyway?”

I dropped the $5 bill into the basket.

I prayed, “Lord, I’m taking a leap of faith here.  I’m trusting you to provide.  If you don’t, I won’t have any food at all. I’m hungry now but, without this five dollars, I will starve. You know I love you, Lord, and you know I trust you. Please help me.”

At that moment, I literally “didn’t have a dime” to my name.

I walked out of Mass and waited for the phone to ring.

It did.  In fact, it rang three times that afternoon.  Three interviews.  I remember being downright giddy – not because I had interviews, that was definitely nice – but even moreso because I knew God had actually heard my prayer!

By the end of that week, I had a job that paid well, offered a flexible schedule, and I had great new co-workers!  I would stay at that job throughout my two coursework years.

My prayer was answered on that day, when I trusted God with everything I had.

That was nearly twenty years ago.  Every time I’m up against the wall, I still have to remind myself that He will provide – but I have to let go of what I’m holding onto first.  I have to make the jump. I have to really, really trust God.  I’ve learned that as long as I’m “playing it safe” and still holding onto something it just doesn’t work.  I can’t hold anything back –  it’s gotta be an “all in” gesture.  Every single time I do this, every time I trust Him completely, He provides.

And, every time, He provides more than I could hope for – way more.

The widow knew this secret.  The power is not in grasping on, clutching tightly to that which we have, but in letting go of everything and handing it over to God.

Trusting God –  it’s terrifying and it’s thrilling – and you can’t get a better deal.

“Take Lord Receive” – John Foley, SJ

Time, Suffering, and the Power of Prayer

Back to the Future

I was chuckling at this meme today and it got me to thinking about time and prayer.

It reminded me of something Padre Pio once said that really challenged my concept of time.

One day, Padre Pio told his doctor, “I’m praying for the good death of my great-great grandfather.”

The doctor said, “but he died more than one hundred years ago!”

Padre Pio replied, “Remember that, for God, there is no past and no future and everything is present. So God made use, at that time, of the prayers I’m saying now.”

It is especially helpful to remember God’s omnipresence when we are suffering. One of the beautiful aspects of the Catholic faith is “redemptive suffering.” The notion that we can combine our suffering with Christ’s passion and offer it up for our own (or another’s) needs is a hopeful concept. When all seems bleak, when we are undergoing profound suffering, this concept gives added meaning and value to suffering.  Suffering is painful but it’s not useless. How beautiful is it that we can even apply our suffering to prayerful intentions for the past or the future?

It also brought to mind a recent comment by a priest that struck me by surprise, “If you find yourself with a cross, you find yourself with Jesus.”  When I think of “my crosses” or “bringing it to the cross,” I often think of the wood of the cross. However, reframing one’s own crosses in light of Christ’s presence there with us at the cross, brings awareness of the privilege of enjoying His presence during our suffering. Suffering together with Christ seems more of an honor and privilege than the lonely prospect of carrying ones’ cross alone.

And, any time things get rough, I always fall back on St. Ignatius’ hope-filled explanation of suffering: “If God causes you to suffer much, it is a sign that He has great designs for you, and that He certainly intends to make you a saint. And if you wish to become a great saint, entreat Him yourself to give you much opportunity for suffering; for there is no wood better to kindle the fire of holy love than the wood of the cross, which Christ used for His own great sacrifice of boundless charity.”

So, when hard times come, as they inevitably will, do not despair!  Make use of that suffering and “offer it up” in prayerful intentions for the past, future, or present and remember that you are not alone – Jesus is always right there with you.

“Christ’s cross, embraced with love, never leads to sadness, but to joy!” -Pope Francis

Matt Maher reminds us of God’s omnipresence in his song “You Were on the Cross”

Gratitude Attack

autumn_leaves

Every year, as the days grow shorter and the skies grayer, I feel immense gratitude. The crisp autumn air, brilliant leaves rustling on the trees, and gusty winds bringing them swirling down to crunch underfoot – it all makes me immensely happy.

It makes me so happy that, during this season, a certain angle of the sun on the pane can literally send my heart into a gratitude attack. My heart overflows with joyful prayers of thanks for the blessings of family and friends, food, clean water, power, transportation, and shelter.

And, every year, this season draws me into a deeper love for the Creator of all of this beauty too. I see the delicate leaves, loved into existence for one short season, at their full glory, swirling down. I think of my soul, my life, all of us, just a “breath” in the span of history, so small, yet so significant because He loves each of us into existence too. As I gaze at the intricate patterns the leaves draw upon the air in their final abandon, the words of St. Ignatius come to mind, “Few souls understand what God would accomplish in them if they were to abandon themselves unreservedly to Him and if they were to allow His grace to mold them accordingly.”

And so I pray:

Dear God,

Creator of the autumn winds,

You cool the summer sun

And paint the autumn hues.

Teach me,

Like the beautiful swirling leaf,

to abandon myself ever more unreservedly to you.

Give me the grace

To allow the breath of your Spirit

To direct my path.

That my swirling journey would intersect at your will

And my landing be at your will.

And that, at every moment,

my journey might bring

greater glory to you, My God.

Amen.

In all created things discern the providence and wisdom of God, and in all things give Him thanks. St. Teresa of Avila

 

My heart your home – Watermark

I Choose Love

I was talking with a friend the other day and he was reciting an endless litany of all of the bad things going on in the world right now: terrorism, horrible refugee situations, the plunging stock market, eroding race relations, the selling of baby body parts, unstable international affairs, etc. He concluded, “Things just aren’t looking good.”

I had to disagree. Yes, there absolutely are a lot of horrible situations in the world right now – situations that we cannot ignore and that we are called to address. We must respect the dignity of human life in every way we possible and this includes helping those experiencing poverty and those without home or nation. We must be living witnesses of respect for people everywhere of all races, nationalities, and creeds, young and old, born and unborn. We must see the reflection of the God who made us in the face of each of our brothers and sisters. We must recognize that we are all one human family and do all we can to alleviate the suffering of our brothers and sisters.

Sometimes, however, we are far away and we don’t feel we have the power to change such situations. We can fall into hopelessness.  We can despair that “the world is falling apart.”

The problem is that hopelessness and despair deny the reality of Christ’s sacrifice and resurrection.  Jesus said, “I have told you this so that you might have peace in me. In the world you will have trouble, but take courage, I have conquered the world.” John 16:33

Jesus offers Hope when everything around us seems to be falling apart. Jesus offers the warmth of his Love when the world seems barren and destitute.

In his August 16, 1967 speech, “Where Do We Go From Here,” the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke of Love in elegant words of timeless import:

“And I say to you, I have also decided to stick with love, for I know that love is ultimately the only answer to mankind’s problems. And I’m going to talk about it everywhere I go. I know it isn’t popular to talk about it in some circles today. And I’m not talking about emotional bosh when I talk about love; I’m talking about a strong, demanding love. And I have seen too much hate. I’ve seen too much hate on the faces …to want to hate, myself, because every time I see it, I know that it does something to their faces and their personalities, and I say to myself that hate is too great a burden to bear. I have decided to love.”

Love is the way.

An ocean away, at nearly the same time in history, Padre Pio of Pietrelcina said, “Don’t spend your energies on things that generate worry, anxiety and anguish. Only one thing is necessary: Lift up your spirit and love God.” Likewise, St. Mary McKillop said, “Do what you can with the means at your disposal and leave all the rest calmly to God.”

Suffering in life is inevitable. There have always been and will always be atrocities and strife. How we react to these difficulties is our choice. We can turn away from our suffering brothers and sisters or we can live in love, encountering, respecting, and serving others compassionately. We can be crippled by fear and worry or we can lift up our hearts in prayer and trust that the God of Love hears us.

Myself?  I choose Hope. I choose Love.

“Set A Fire” – Will Regan & United Pursuit Band